Bali Travel Budget | 30 Days in Nomad Paradise

Rich Uyesugi

Most digital nomads end up in Chiang Mai due to its value but I'm here to tell you that the best value is found in Bali, Indonesia and specifically Ubud. I've been there 5 times myself so I feel qualified to write a post on a digital nomad Bali travel budget.

I've created the budget plan for a 30-day trip which will be common for many of you due to the nature of Indonesia visas. I always assume most digital nomads want to get the most out of their stays so if you plan to go for 2 weeks, just extrapolate the costs.

So how much money do I need in Bali?

Here is a complete breakdown of a 30 Day Bali Travel Budget:

If you just want a quick idea of how much money you need in Bali here goes, but below I'll detail some of these items:

30-Day Visa – Free
Central Ubud Homestay Rental – $600
High Quality Food – $750
Weekly Massage – $80
Scooter Rental – $200
16GB Sim Card – $25
Weekly Laundry – $20
Co-Working Pass – $100
Entertainment – $200
Misc – $200

Total 30-Day Bali Travel Budget in Canadian Dollars – $2175

Total 30-Day Bali Travel Budget in US Dollars – $1630

Flight excluded you are looking at about $70/day and you could certainly go lower but I like to be relatively comfortable.

Detailed Bali Travel Budget Breakdown

30-Day Visa – Free

As a Canadian, and many other nationalities, you get a 30-day visa for free. Now, you can get a 60-Day visa known as a Visa On Arrival. You have to buy it right before you enter immigration. It costs about 50 CAD or 35 USD. This allows you to extend you visa for an additional 30 days.

However, not only do you have to pay this fee, but you have to pay about $65 to get it extended with a visa consultancy. You'll need to go and get finger-printed and pick up your passport at the visa extension office in Denpasar.

The alternative is just to fly out at the 30 day mark to Singapore for a single day trip. You can leave in the morning and return at night. Immigration doesn't care if you do this, all they care about is that you respect their immigration rules.

Central Ubud Homestay Rental $600

Homestays are very common in Ubud, Bali. I have used them most of the time I've been in Bali because they are so cheap!

A homestay is typically a private room that resides within a family home. It might sound like it lacks privacy but it doesn't You might walk past a few other homes/families as you enter the premises but you have your own key, entrance and private area.

Typically you get a queen sized bed, a bathroom with toilet and shower separated, a sink area, a small wardrobe and maybe a side table. It's not much, but you shouldn't spend too much time there unless you are tired and ready to sleep.

For this price I expect air-conditioning. Now this price is based on contracting with the room owner privately. Bali people are so nice. Just walk around and go into some homestays and ask for the owner and get a tour. Let them know how long you are staying and ask for their best price. Balinese love to negotiate. It's all very friendly though.

If you want to book online I recommend Expedia which often has the best cancellation policy.

Sometimes you get a place that has a pool but it's not always the case.

Here are two Ubud homestays I highly recommend:

Tude Homestay and Umah Anila. Great owners and very kind families.

Bali Travel Budget - Sayuri Smoothie Bowl

High Quality Food $750

Eating well is a priority for me. Now I'm not talking grandiose, I'm talking about quality, non-processed, plant-based food. No doubt Ubud is the best in the world when it comes to plant-based cuisine. They somehow skipped over the first-world fast food culture and became known for their abundance of vegan and vegetarian food.

My typical day would be a $8 breakfast which would most likely be a high-value smoothie with lots of top notch ingredients such as tumeric, berries, maca, fresh coconut or almost milk, etc.

Lunch might be a salad, a macro bowl or smoothie bowl, or a western style meal. You probably would spend about $8-12.

Dinner could be a nice classic Bali dish such as Nasi Campur or Nasi Goreng, or you could try one of the hot new vegan joints such as Alchemy, Clear Cafe, Sayuri's Healing Food, Zest and many others. They have so many unique options you are going to have to see for yourself. They prepare foods that are going to blow your mind both in terms of freshness, health and design. Last night I had a green elixir that used charcoal ice to keep it cold. You'll spend about $10-14 if you have a quality meal with a beverage.

I don't really drink much alcohol, but Bintang beer is about $2.50 and is the standard in Bali.

Weekly Massage – $80

The Spas in Bali are dirt cheap. It is a major commodity service so price is competitive everywhere you go. You can expect a 60 minute traditional Balinese massage to run you about $20 all-in. I've had a 3-hour massage, body scrub, rose bath and facial for under $60.

I recommend Sang Spa 2 and I do not recommend anywhere else. You can't beat it.

Scooter Rental – $200

Scooter is the standard form of transport in Bali. Now if you stay at one of the homestay's I recommended that you'll be hella central and can walk everywhere you go. But having a scooter saves you time and is a very wonderful experience to feel the breeze as you drive through the beautiful streets of Ubud.

My experience has been that scooters cost about $5-7 a day. I don't know much about scooters but there first time I ever rode on was in Bali and I found it relatively easy to learn how to ride.

It might seem dangerous, and no doubt you need to be careful, but I find that since the roads are scooter dominated that people are very conscious of riders and cars drive with awareness. I never had to show my license when I rented, but the lady would say “You drive? You drive?” – I nodded yes even thought I had never tried before.

There is a gas station heading southbound from the CoCo Supermarket. If you go to Ubud, you'll see the supermarket. Most people stop there at some point. I also recommend getting your cash out using their ATM.

16GB Sim Card – $25

Buy it at the airport just after you pick up your baggage. I had 4g my entire trip and it loaded on my phone automatically. Literally plug and play.

Note, not all website are available in Indonesia such as Vimeo, Reddit and others. So you might need a VPN to access them.

Weekly Laundry – $20

Laundry is very cheap in Ubud running you about $1/Kg. It perfectly ironed, folded and returned in plastic wrap. Great price and easy to find a laundry service wherever you are. It is a common business for the locals.

Bali Travel Budget - Co-Working

Co-Working Pass – $100

Now if you are a digital nomad then you are probably looking for quality internet. That means you'll probably want to work out of one of the co-working spaces. The two to choose from are Hubud and Outpost. Both are decent but getting very crowded these days. Internet speed is about 30 up and 30 down. You can't find much faster.

It isn't cheap to work at these places and you typically pay hourly. If you don't need to upload video then you can easily get away working at a cafe. I recommend working out of (sorry I can't give you my top spots), but I will say there are plenty of nice spots with decent wifi.

I use Outpost when I do want to be in a co-working environment.

Entertainment $200

To be honest, there isn't that much entertainment in Ubud beyond eating and drinking. If you travel to the beaches of Bali such as Uluwatu or Kuta then there is plenty to do, but for me I'm working a lot so I don't spend much on entertainment.

On Saturdays, I like to go for shisha and live music at XL Shisha Lounge.

Misc – $200

Obviously your misc is different that mine, but some things I find myself buying unexpectedly are power adapters, rain gear, medicine, the odd taxi (always bargain they are everywhere and desperate for business) and gifts.

Bali Travel Budget - Uluwatu

Final Thoughts on preparing a Bali travel budget

Bali is cheap. That is the bottom line. It's clean, safe and has great weather. If you are a digital nomad you will love Bali.

I choose to come to Ubud, because it is a spiritually advanced place. A rare place on this earth that values happiness more than money.

But I do believe my budget would be accurate for everywhere in Bali, except Seminyak which is known to be the upscale area with the higher-end shops, restaurants and resorts.

I think that for most nomads, the quality of living is secondary to the ability to work remotely in a place superior and more affordable than your hometown. This is certainly the case for this Vancouver-native resident.

But what's also exciting is that for many of you you'll be able to afford $3-5k a month and be able to live here like royalty.

If you have any questions that you think I can answer about your Bali travel budget leave a comment below.

~Stay rich, stay niche ~

Rich

PS. Here is my Google Map:

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